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Vocabulary - SAT, TOEFL, GRE Test Preparation
3.25 Words and Expressions Commonly Misused - 1

Directions: Review the following words and expressions commonly misused. For each of these words and expressions, write example sentences to show incorrect and correct usage.
Many of the words and expressions here listed are not so much bad English as bad style, the commonplaces of careless writing. As illustrated under Feature, the proper correction is likely to be not the replacement of one word or set of words by another, but the replacement of vague generality by definite statement.

All right: Idiomatic in familiar speech as a detached phrase in the sense, “Agreed,” or “Go ahead.” In other uses better avoided. Always written as two words.

As good or better than: Expressions of this type should be corrected by rearranging the sentence.

Example:
My opinion is as good or better than his.
My opinion is as good as his, or better (if not better).

As to whether: Whether is sufficient.

Bid Takes the infinitive without to. The past tense is bade.

Case: The Concise Oxford Dictionary begins its definition of this word: “instance of a thing’s occurring; usual state of affairs.” In these two senses, the word is usually unnecessary.

Example:
In many cases, the rooms were poorly ventilated.
Many of the rooms were poorly ventilated.

It has rarely been the case that any mistake has been made.
Few mistakes have been made.

Certainly: Used indiscriminately by some speakers, much as others use very, to intensify any and every statement. A mannerism of this kind, bad in speech, is even worse in writing.

Character: Often simply redundant, used from a mere habit of wordiness.

Example:
Acts of a hostile character
Hostile acts

Claim, vb: With object-noun, means lay claim to. May be used with a dependent clause if this sense is clearly involved: Example:
He claimed that he was the sole surviving heir.” (But even here, “claimed to be” would be better.) Not to be used as a substitute for declare, maintain, or charge.

Compare: To compare to is to point out or imply resemblances, between objects regarded as essentially of different order; to compare with is mainly to point out differences, between objects regarded as essentially of the same order. Thus life has been compared to a pilgrimage, to a drama, to a battle; Congress may be compared with the British Parliament. Paris has been compared to ancient Athens; it may be compared with modern London.

Clever: This word has been greatly overused; it is best restricted to ingenuity displayed in small matters.

Consider: Not followed by as when it means, “believe to be.”

Example:
I consider him thoroughly competent.” Compare, “The lecturer considered Cromwell first as soldier and second as administrator,” where “considered” means “examined” or “discussed.”


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